It seems like there are basically two types
of Metroid game. There are games like Super Metroid and Metroid
Prime, where Samus is alone and isolated, in the caverns of an uncharted alien planet. And there are games like Metroid Fusion and
Metroid: Other M, where Samus is told what to do and where to go, by characters and computers
who bark orders down her headset. Metroid Prime 3 can’t quite decide what
type of Metroid game it wants to be. This game was released in 2007 for the Wii,
and it wastes no time in showing off the unique possibilities of a motion-controlled Metroid
game, with, well, a bunch of goofy, gimmicky waggle bits for inputting passwords and opening
doors. But also! A fully realised FPS control scheme that remains
pretty much unparalleled to this day, and was so good that developer Retro Studios re-released
Metroid Prime 1 and 2 with these controls. But it also used the added power of the Wii
to create moments that make Prime 3 almost indistinguishable as a Metroid game. So, when the game begins, on board the GFS
Olympus, we get long expository cutscenes with fully voiced characters. And then, we blast off to the planet Norion,
where we’re working alongside other characters – being told what to do and where to go, as
we race down linear corridors. Here, you’ll find dramatic set pieces, cinematic
explosions, bonkers boss fights, and a last ditch effort to stop a meteor strike. I’m sure i’m not the first to say this,
but at this point in the game – Prime 3 feels more like a Halo game than a Metroid one. And it seems like maybe the days of quietly
uncovering abilities and backtracking through spooky caverns are gone – in favour of bombastic
action sequences and nannying objective markers. But it turns out that this is just a prologue. Not a quick one like Super Metroid’s Ceres
Station or Metroid Prime’s space pirate Frigate, mind you. This thing takes about 90 minutes to finish. But it is just a pre-game teaser. Because at the end of Norion, everything changes When Samus wakes up a month later – her suit
now corrupted by Phazon energy – her allies, Gandrayda, Ghor, and Rundas, have left the
scene, leaving Samus free to explore on her own. Also, the world opens up: so now Samus can
make more choices about where she goes and what she does. And the more traditional Metroid structure,
of finding items and backtracking to clear blocked paths, has returned. So if Prime 3 wants to open up with a crazy action
scene to get you all excited, before returning to more classic Metroid action – then that’s
cool by me. Except… the spectre of that opening section
never truly goes away. So, with the hilarity on Norion out of the
way, Samus now has a clear and defining objective: the meteor blast showered the galaxy with
corruptive leviathan seeds, and now Samus has to go purge them and whatnot. Usual saving the universe type stuff. Now, Prime 1 took place in a single, interconnected
world – where unique areas like the Phazon Mines and Phendrana Drifts, criss-crossed
into each other with a maze-like network of elevators. Prime 2 was similar, but its three areas felt
much more self-contained. They splintered off from a hub world, they
were called temples, and for the most part you focused on one area at a time – all of
which made Prime 2’s areas feel almost like Zelda dungeons. Prime 3 splits its areas even further apart
– like, millions of miles apart. Because instead of exploring a single planet,
Samus uses her gunship to bounce between several. And that means, yes, Prime 3 marks the first
time Samus’s ship actually gets used outside of the opening and closing cutscenes, which
is cool. So after getting your mission on the GFS Olympus
and repelling the space pirate attack on Norion, you’ll also get to travel to Bryyo: a sort
of mini Metroid Prime with ruins, lava chambers, and icy corridors. Elysia, a prototype Bioshock Infinite, where
Samus uses zip-lines to whip between floating platforms. The Pirate Homeworld, which is a military
base, beset by pounding acid rain. And the GFS Valhalla: a wrecked ship, teeming
with familiar alien lifeforms. Each area is memorably distinct, which is
good. Though the street-level layout of the areas
can make them a little challenging to navigate. Elysia looks pretty similar everywhere you
go, for example, making it tough to remember the exact locations of key areas. And the two main locations, Bryyo and Elysia,
are not exactly a knot of interconnected tunnels, but more stretched out highways that you’ll
need to traverse. Like Metroid Prime 2, these areas are pretty
self contained, and you’re often forced to explore them in a particular order. In fact, while the game lets you pick between
Bryoo and Elysia at the start of your adventure, you’ll soon find out that the front door
to Elysia is completely locked – and won’t be open until you beat the boss at the end
of Bryyo and unlock the Hyper Ball. Not much of a choice, then. And so, outside of any sequence breaking silliness,
you’ll get the missiles on Olympus, then the grapple on Norion, before heading off
to Bryyo to get a bunch of items and destroy the seed. Then more items on Elysia, and destroy the
seed there. And finally off to the Pirate Homeworld to
open access to the final boss rush at the end of the game. There’s also Valhalla, but more on that
later. Except, just like Prime 2, there are indeed
moments where you need to go back to the other planets. You’ll hit a dead end on Elysia, forcing
you to return to Bryyo and get the screw attack. And you’ll be stuck in the Pirate Homeworld,
if you don’t return to Elysia to get the spider ball. Unlike Prime 2, though, the game does tell
you to go back to previous planets. When you enter this wall-jump room, the game
says “the item you need may reside on a world you have previously visited”. and
when you get the grapple voltage, you’re told that there’s “hidden Chozo artifacts
on Skytown”. But while that’s preferable to the situation
in Prime 2 – is it really the best solution to just have some omnipotent voice tell you
where to go? Because Metroid Prime 3 is a game that doesn’t
shut up. Like, as soon as you step off the ship on
Bryyo, an organic supercomputer called Aurora pipes up to let you know what to do and where
to go. There’s a nearby downed ship, apparently,
and we need to reach it. And from that point onwards, the Aurora regularly
pipes up, giving you new objectives and directions. And this is with the hint system turned off,
as i’ve played all three Prime games with hints disabled to see how the game communicates
where to go without these nagging tips. Now, sometimes it’s okay, I guess: the computer
tells you where to go, but not how to get there. You can’t just wander towards the map marker
to get to that downed ship, because you’ll come across this dead end. Meaning you’ll need to explore elsewhere
on Bryyo, find the grapple beam, and come back. And there are long spells where the computer
shuts up for a bit and lets you explore for yourself. But there are also times where you essentially
need these prompts to progress, and that’s because Prime 3 regularly breaks a key part
of the Metroid design formula. You see, typically in Metroid games, you come across
a blocked path – like a corridor filled with lava. You then find a new ability – like an ice
missile. And then you must make the connection between
these two things, remember where the blocked path was, figure out how to get there, and
use your new ability to make further progress. It’s basically just a series of locks and
keys, but it’s those logical connections between the keys and the locks that allows
you to explore Metroid games without a single word of dialogue In Prime 3, the lock and key metaphor breaks
apart, as new areas unlock at seemingly random intervals. When you get the screw attack, the Aurora
says you can now go explore the Valhalla ship. When you find the x-ray visor on the Space
Pirate home world, a soldier calls up and says you can now explore a new zone. When you fix these panels on Elysia, your
ship – which was previously broken – suddenly becomes repaired and capable of flying. When there’s no clear cause and effect between
these events, between these keys and locks, the only way the game can communicate where to go is to explicitly tell you, leading to a lot of the had-holding moments that the game exhibits. And then, if you’re like me, you get so
used to being told where to go and what to do that it can be overwhelming when you finally
have to go find something for yourself. Like using the plasma beam – found on Elysia
– to melt a frozen entrance back on Bryyo. Because when you’re led to believe that
the game will just tell you where to go, you kinda just stop taking the time to remember where locked doors and obstacles are altogether. A reccuring aspect of the Prime games is the
key hunt: where you must track down a number of items throughout the game, to unlock something
at the end of the adventure. Metroid Prime had the Chozo artifiacts, and
Prime 2 had the Sky Temple Keys. Both were cool in how they rewarded exploration
and let you find them out of order, but both had issues: especially in how they killed
the pace of both games by suddenly asking you to explore the entire world map before
you can finish. Prime 3 also has a key hunt, but the execution
is quite different. In the game, you’ll come across energy cells:
big batteries that you rip out of power conductors. And these act as keys inside the GFS Valhalla,
where sections of the ship are inaccessible until you turn on the power. Like the other Prime games, you can get clues
about where these energy cells are hidden, and they are found outside of the main item
hunt – meaning you can get them out of order. But there are differences to Prime 1 and 2. For one, you can start the hunt very early
on, with the first cell becoming available for pick-up while on Bryyo for the first time,
and with only a handful of items under your belt. There’s no need to wait until the end of the game. And also, you don’t need to get all of the
keys. You only need 5 out of the 9 possible cells
to get to the most important room in Valhalla: a place with the password to the space pirate’s
battleship. The other keys merely unlock secret rooms,
containing upgrades and items. Of course: because you don’t know which
doors are optional, you might spend them unnecessarily and still end up needing to go off and do
a last minute key hunt. But overall: I think this is a good change:
those who are ready to just finish the game don’t need to find all nine, but it does reward
players who really take the time to explore every nook and cranny of the world. Especially because these cells are sometimes
locked behind cool puzzles and optional boss fights. Energy Cell 4, for example, makes good use
of the gunship’s extended abilities. The ship can be equipped with missiles to
blow holes through walls, and also a big grapple beam. And for this fourth energy cell, you need
to build a bridge between two areas, so your ship can carry a power generator halfway across
the planet. This is the sort of macro-level puzzle that
I enjoy in Zelda dungeons, and is often missing from Metroid. So while Metroid Prime 3 does have some really
cool puzzle box moments with shifting areas and giant mechanical contraptions, they’re
almost always limited to a single room, removing the need to think beyond the four walls around
you. Anyway. While the energy cells are cool, one big problem
is that there’s really nothing that interesting to find on Valhalla, beyond the password you
need to finish the game. Other than that, it’s just typical power-ups:
there’s an energy tank, a ship missile, and a few missile tanks. This is because Prime 3 is the only Prime
game without secret weapons or optional upgrades, like the charge combos in Prime 1 and 2. And, also, the game is very generous with
energy tanks. You’ll find a bunch on the critical path
and a few more very easily, giving you loads of health. And so while Prime 3 is the only game in the
trilogy where you can show all of the items on the map, thanks to the handy Chozo observatory,
this stuff is really only there for completionists who want to see 100% on their save file, I
reckon. So Metroid Prime 3 is an interesting game. In moments, it feels like classic Metroid
with interesting environments, cool new power ups, intriguing contraptions, and so on. And I think the gunship is a really cool addition
to the series, as it ties into exploration, combat, and puzzle-solving in interesting
ways. Plus, I like the planet hopping nature of
the game. I’m not such a Metroidvania purist that
i think the whole game has to take place in a single contiguous space, and zipping between
planets adds to the sci-fi feel of the game – even if it is just, functionally, a long
loading screen. But at other times, Prime 3 strays closer
to the problematic end of the Metroid spectrum, with long linear paths to traverse and way
too much hand-holding. At one point, when the Aurora computer finally
gave Samus permission to dock at a landing site, it really reminded me of a certain moment
in a later Metroid game on Wii. And there are so many moments in this game
that make Metroid stray away from what makes the series great, like a time where you have
to fight an army of enemies while defending a flying bomb. It’s at these points that it starts to feel
like every other sci-fi shooter. Because if you want to play Halo, just play
Halo. We play Metroid for exploration, solitude,
and adventure – not shooty shooty bang bang. All in all, Prime 3 is maybe just below the
quality of Prime 1 and 2. And while it brings lots of new ideas to the
series, not all of them are successful. And for many, many years it seemed like a
bit of a shame that the Prime series would end on its weakest point. But now, with Metroid Prime 4 in development
for Switch – at Retro Studios, no less, fingers crossed that the studio will find that magic
again. Thanks so much for watching! That brings the Metroid section of Boss Keys
to a close, for now, at least. Next time on the show… well, let’s just
say, it’s gonna be a big one.

The World Design of Metroid Prime 3: Corruption | Boss Keys
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100 thoughts on “The World Design of Metroid Prime 3: Corruption | Boss Keys

  • September 17, 2019 at 8:52 pm
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    You were mistaken, Metroid Prime Hunters for DS was the first Metroid game to involve planet-hopping. It predates Prime 3.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 8:57 pm
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    It feels more "shooty shooty bang bang" because of the wii remote maybe? Encouraging the shooter part of it.

    I don't remember much of mp3, but I don't remember much of mp1 either, so I don't know. 😛

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 8:57 pm
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    my only two thing on my metroid prime 4 wishlist is dual analog controls and larger scale and more freedom.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:00 pm
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    Aaaah, Boss Keys! A YouTube series celebrated for its excellence!

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:02 pm
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    My most anticipated video!!!

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:06 pm
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    Metroid Prime 3 wasn't the first Metroid to let you travel between planets mid-game. The first game to do it was Metroid Prime Hunters, which came out in 2006.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:15 pm
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    yes

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  • September 17, 2019 at 9:18 pm
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    Well I guess I dont have to ask for a Hollow Knight episode then, huh.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:19 pm
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    Shooty shooty bang bang ?? Wait…thats from ceave gaming !

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:27 pm
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    One of the things I dislike about Metroidvania is the late game. A few hours in you have explored and got a good understanding of a small area. A few hours later, you can still find your way around, but are starting to forget where exact things are hidden, and have to search around a bit more. But as you approach the end, the maps get so big, that finding what you want becomes a needle in a haystack. Maybe if we all played through these games in one fast sitting it wouldn't be so bad, but if you play another game for a bit, or go away, or do anythign with your life for a few days, I feel liek you're basically screwed.
    That's why I think the planet structure could be so good. Instead of remembering some small detail you disregarded 18 hours of playtime, and over a week of real time ago, you can be reasssured that if you keep at it for a few hours, come back 2 or three days running, you'll eventually hit a clean cutoff point, and can stop, and come back, without fear of getting lost. Just my thoughts.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:28 pm
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    YES ! HOLLOW KNIGHT IS NEXT BOSS KEYS !

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:28 pm
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    I think you are being a little harsh on 3 as a game. Sure, as a metroidvania game it is lacking, but as a pick up and go casual adventure it is great! It’s not going to win any emmys or anything, and I think it may be the weaker of the prime series pure gameplay wise, but you kind of downplayed the importance of presentation. It’s like a fun fast and furious movie, a game that can be experienced cinematically with fun characters and events instead of just mechanically played. I think we disparage the cinematic eliments that were in 2000’s games too much.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:31 pm
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    Prime 3 is my favorite Metroid title, one of my favorite games of all time really, though I did start with it before playing Primes 1 or 2 so maybe I have a different perspective on it. Regardless, I think it's structure is strong and reminiscent more of Zero Mission than Fusion. The prople giving you orders being more like the Chozo statues than Adam.

    I also can't describe it as easy to navigate or "hand-holding". I felt I was finding the answer to most problems or finding the right path on my own rather than it being directed for me. Maybe that's just me, not sure if that is really reflected in the game to be honest.

    Of course, the other main strength is the shooting and world building. Each planet feels unique and the characters are interesting. In general, the presentation is fantastic.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:34 pm
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    The shooty shooty bang bang bored me so much that I never completed MP3.

    Really hope MP4 drops all the action & ramps up the exploration.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:46 pm
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    Shadow of the Colossus?

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:55 pm
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    is there gonna be an episode for Metroid 2 or 4?

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 9:59 pm
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    Don't you dare compare Fusion to Other M.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:00 pm
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    Prime 3 has no water in it. It's a very dry game. ;p

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:01 pm
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    I do think Nintendo/Retro felt some pressure or allure to make Metroid into a cinematic sci fi tail akin to Halo. And while the structure can be very linear or semi-linear/limited, I absolutely loved this game. A lot of it was the nostalgic elements- the Mother Brain references, the Pirate Homeworld. I actually liked the other Hunters and their responses to being "corrupted", and the controls worked perfectly. The game looked great too. It was linear at times and not an inter-connected maze, but it never felt like the game was babying me. Corruption is the most underrated Metroid to me.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:05 pm
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    Metroid Prime didn't end on 3. It ended on Federation Force! … Really makes you wish it had ended on 3, huh? 😥
    But yeah, 4 is coming so kind of an unimportant point now.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:08 pm
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    Honestly, I think you're exaggerating when you say this game is "hand holding" and "doesn't shut up". It works pretty well for this game. Also, I would say that prime 2 is the weakest of the trilogy.

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  • September 17, 2019 at 10:10 pm
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    "The power of the Wii." Boy, that’s not a phrase you hear very often.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:13 pm
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    This is also the easiest Metroid game. I actually 100%. I've never done that in any Metroid game.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:17 pm
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    is there even a game that beats hollow knight in value?

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:20 pm
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    I said once and I'll say it again: I won't buy a Switch until Metroid Prime 4 is released!.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:23 pm
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    You mention that you get a lot of Energy Tanks, but you don't mention why the designers would do this; Hypermode using up your energy tanks, and being required to use for the Seed Bosses, means that E-Tanks are a lot more important, and arguably necessary for a first-time player to beat the game.

    It's also worth noting that not only do you only need 5 Energy Cells, but 2 of them are required to obtain, and 4 of them are so close to the main path that they're basically free (One of them literally at the front door of the Valhalla). This is actually a stark contrast from Prime 1 and Echoes, where a good portion of the Artefacts and Keys are so far out of the way that you need to do a lot of tedious backtracking even if you're not going for 100%. It even made me appreciate the puzzle with the Ship Grapple even more, because for as long as it is, it is totally optional.

    Also, "Prime 3 marks the first time Samus’s ship actually gets used outside of the opening and closing cutscenes".

    Yeah, people like forgetting Hunters. Shame, cause I think it gives a good impression of what Nintendo's idea of a Prime game would have been. I even think it's one of the most non-linear Metroid games. There might be something interesting in there for a future episode

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  • September 17, 2019 at 10:24 pm
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    yeeeeesss Hollowknightttttt!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:26 pm
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    I think Metroid Prime 3 nailed a perfect balance between the purist Metroid games and a space opera. It's far away from Halo, especially the atmosphere and the distinct areas help that you (or me) don't get lost too much in the world, like in the first Metroid Prime. Also there seem to be a big riddle in every world (giant bomb and so on) that makes it more of a special place than the areas in previous games. I don't know, I like the balance they made in MP3…I realize you can't proper shorten this title, Metroid Prime 3. The great and revolutionary shooter mechanics should be the blueprint for future fps and interactions with the world also worked better.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:27 pm
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    I never thought about it before, but power cells work really well for universal keys, or at least, they make more sense than Zelda keys: which fit every lock in one dungeon, and only that dungeon, and break after use. On the other hand a power cell being universal in a dungeon makes more sense, the fact you can't use them in a completely different dungeon can be handwaved as using a different kind, and being spent also makes sense.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:28 pm
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    I don't care what anyone says, the lack of any responsive solution for turning far outweighs any merits pointer aiming may have had. Plus it's just uncomfortable. This was the most tolerable it ever got (outside of on-rail shooters) thanks to the lock on mechanic, and I still couldn't push through it

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:35 pm
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    That tease in the credits scene… HYPE.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:41 pm
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    I don't know, with the way the Prime series evolved over time, I think Prime 4 might be a full on 3rd person action shooting game with RPG elements and crafting.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:43 pm
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    As a designer thinking about incorporating 3D Metroidvania mechanics into the next project I'm working on, I was watching the first 2 Prime videos a couple of days ago thinking about when the Prime 3 video would be dropped. After seeing this today I had a genuine 'fuck yeah!' fist pump moment. Keep up the great work!

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:43 pm
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    I really disagree that this one is the weakest in the series. While it might have less traditional Metroid aspects, it felt like a necessary shift after how stale Metroid prime 2 felt.

    It took a lot of risks for the series but calling it weak because those risks aren't "Metroid" enough is how you drive a developer to kill a series.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 10:54 pm
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    I must be the only person who liked Prime 3 more than Prime 2.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:01 pm
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    After playing Metroid Prime 1 and 2 I greatly appreciated the more linear approach this game took and felt the cinematics were a natural progression in adding something new to the series so it felt more fresh. The tacked on motion controls were annoying however but most other additions felt right.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:03 pm
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    Here's hoping the beams don't stack in 4

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  • September 17, 2019 at 11:13 pm
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    When's Hollow Knight?

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:22 pm
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    It's finally back thank god

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:31 pm
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    Hollow knight time baby. The game where you either love it to bits, is too hard for you, or you're me.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:35 pm
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    Hope to see more Metroid Boss Keys episodes to delve into Metroid Fusion, and Other M. Fusion was my first Metroid game, and Other M just didn't quite work for me; first Metroid I was actually disappointed in.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:38 pm
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    Doesn't sound so good. Oof

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  • September 17, 2019 at 11:38 pm
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    played metroidvanias but never played metroid i am a fraud ahah

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:49 pm
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    Please do Okami!

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:53 pm
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    Hollow Knight!!!!

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:57 pm
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    So… no Prime Hunters? I can't be the only one who things the game is underrated.

    Reply
  • September 17, 2019 at 11:59 pm
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    I’m surprised at how critical you ended up being of all three Prime games; it didn’t sound like you particularly enjoyed any of them. Which is perfectly fine! But I do think viewing a game through a specific lens can have its drawbacks. Like, viewing these games purely through the lens of “how good is this at executing the traditional Metroid formula?” can make you miss just how good these games are AS GAMES. The mixture of atmosphere, puzzle solving, combat all rolling into one at any given moment is what I think makes this series so iconic, not necessarily its execution of the classic Metroidvania design.

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:01 am
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    Your analysis is sound as always, and I'm always so impressed by it – but honestly, I think one of the most underrated parts of your videos, at least by me, is how well your animations and interfaces are. They look so extremely casual and intuitive that they feel like you just bought some pre-built software which does exactly this for all kinds of, well, video game upgrade orders and level design layouts for example, and that's quite a feat!

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:15 am
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    I really liked Metroid Prime 3 back in the day, its cinematic-ness worked really well for me. I still like it today, more than most people I think; the feel of the first game is a lot more important for me today, but I still enjoy both a lot. (I've never been a fan of 2 at all). I've also made it a challenge for me to find and collect all energy cells for Valhalla before entering it the first time, which obviously only works on your second playthrough but is a great challenge to make that more interesting, and it's a really satisfying feeling to accomplish that.

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:17 am
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    I
    CANNOT
    wait
    for
    your
    next
    video
    <3

    i anticipate it may well be 25+ minutes long.

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:26 am
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    12:18 It's worth noting for those who haven't played the game that the energy tanks isn't just to make the game easier. Prime 3 added a new combat ability called Hypermode, which (to dumb it down) basically involves using your health as weapon ammo. I'm guessing the devs wanted to make sure players had enough health to feel comfortable experimenting with hypermode early on, so they were prepared later when enemies started being balanced around it.

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:34 am
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    Well well, SOMEONE woke up on the wrong side of Norion!

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:39 am
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    WHAT BIG ONE!?! I WANT A BIG ONE!!

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:43 am
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    Is it just me or that sounded more like a review than a boss key episode?

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:44 am
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    Now I have to play Hollow Knight to go along with the series

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:49 am
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    I dunno how to feel. Seems like all the things that I found neat that made me feel like an actual bounty hunter hired by my old employer (some space government military), were just annoyances to Mark Brown. I felt like this game gave me such a clearer picture of the world Samus lives in, but I guess all that pesky world-building is just rubbish to some people.

    The game doesn't shut up? It does, actually. Now Sonic Heroes is a game that doesn't shut up. And Hell, it's not like you were told exactly where to go without the hint system. They might say "Go to Bryyo", but they sure don't tell you what room. What would've happened had they said nothing? You would get the powerup, come to a dead end, decide to explore an old planet. . . oh look, you're doing what the game told you to do anyway.

    Oh yeah, and that's an extremely low blow at the end comparing it to Other M cuz of the docking bay. For those of you who don't know the context (because Mark Brown decided to omit it for some reason), the docking bay could only be accessed by the organic super computer. . . which was corrupted by phazon the first time you found the docking bay. The instant you walk into that room after fixing the corrupted computer, the docking bay unlocks. Pretty different from walking around a volcano for 20 minutes while Adam sits in the AC, only allowed to turn on your life-saving suit when you're about to die in a cutscene.

    Overall, I just dunno. The production value is good as always, but I can't help feeling this is the weakest analysis of the Boss Keys series so far.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 12:58 am
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    3:40

    Wow, that sounds exactly like a subtler rendition of a Gears of War audio clip whenever a mysterious scene occurs.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:01 am
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    I think you caught how I feel about this game greatly. "Just below the standards of Prime 1 and 2, but it introduces cool new ideas". Like Prime 3 is freaking epic, and it has a big story like Fusion and Other M but it isn't that intrusive and bad; and you have classic Metroid moments everywhere. It's hard to say why I enjoy Prime 1 and 2 more, but dang Prime 3 is a 10/10 tbh.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:02 am
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    As a kid who grew up without an Xbox or PlayStation, I always loved the Halo-ish sections of Prime 3. They were the closest I could get to the bombastic action of kids with other consoles. I recognize that from a zoomed-out, cost-is-no-issue perspective, losing the things which make Metroid unique is arguably a bad directorial choice. I wouldn’t even disagree with that. But if you factor in barriers to accessing some of those other experiences — which might not even exist as much today as they did in the 2000s — there’s maybe something to be said for the series branching out a bit and trying to balance some different modes of engagement. I certainly agree that it’s far too handhold-y and far too talkative. But I don’t think there’s anything wrong with Samus playing Master Chief for a few setpieces, if for nothing else then to add some variety. I dunno. Great video as always though!

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:08 am
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    Thank you for these!

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:11 am
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    I enjoyed this review, but I think you're being too critical of the "shooty-shooty, bang-bang" sections, as I felt like they were like they were boss fights with a twist. Especially with your example of fighting off space pirates on a "flying bomb". Not only was it exciting that you were on a Skytown platform, armed with a thermonuclear warhead, free falling to make contact with a Leviathan, but the added danger of needing to repair the escape pod by soldering the circuit board with the plasma cannon was absolutely thrilling–it's one of the most memorable moments in gaming for me.

    You talk about easy to get energy tanks, but ignore hyper mode. You say how good the Wii remote feels in game, but criticize it for adding more action. You mention how only perfectionists care about 100%, but disregard that this effects the ending you get since the first game.

    You have valid points, but it just feels like you went after low hanging fruit. What's obvious is that it's different for a Metroid game; however, it's also obvious that it was the only Metroid on the Wii. More story and lore to give context to more action, taking advantage of a new control scheme without sacrificing too much of the theme (in fact, adds more dimension) and classic gameplay makes it an excellent game and sequel, period.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:16 am
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    Honestly the kotor games are prime examples of how to do this style of game right. Love those games.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:17 am
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    yay boss keys

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:27 am
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    "Gonna be a big one"
    Already can't wait!

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:45 am
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    Prime 4…

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  • September 18, 2019 at 2:01 am
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    The fact that Skytown's Chozo Observatory got brushed aside in your video is incredibly disappointing. I was expecting you to talk about how markedly useful it is that the game maps collectible items for the player. Would have loved a whole section of the video dedicated to that, as it's generally viewed as one of the most brilliant gameplay bits of the entire Metroid series…

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  • September 18, 2019 at 2:16 am
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    "fingers crossed that the studio will find that magic again" me too man.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 2:31 am
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    I don’t think MP3 is worse than the others for focusing more on combat, but because its combat is also shallower than the first two. Hyper mode lets you kill everything as long as you have enough health, and as you say in the video that’s in no short supply. I think there needed to be a separate phazon resource or something that was upgraded as well. The number of missile expansions was also so high that they became pointless halfway into the game. Basically more variety in upgrades could’ve made the exploration feel worth it.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:10 am
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    Can't wait for Hollow Knight! Gonna be like an hour long video…

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:16 am
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    I kinda liked Shooty-Shooty Bang Bang, but the series didn’t really hit its stride until Shooty-Shooty Bang Bang 3: Revelation Origins.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:19 am
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    Did you guys use the AM2R soundtrack in the background at the beginning? 😂

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:19 am
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    Uhh that tease at the end…

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:39 am
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    As this was my first Metroid game, I'm pretty heavily biased. But I still, after having played all the rest, have a special place for Prime 3. In few other Metroids will you find people not looking to kill you outright, and I guess I kinda like that.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:45 am
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    Metroid Prime 3 is cool as fuck and I will not tolerate any dismissive commentary about how it’s not an empty objective-less dungeon crawl

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:46 am
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    The world design of Mexico City: Corruption

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:48 am
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    As much as I love Prime 3, I'm totally willing to admit that it is not a well designed game, especially when it comes to the gunship's functionality.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 3:52 am
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    Yay, gmtk video, let's gooooo

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:00 am
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    I really hope Metroid Prime 4 is good. I will be so destroyed if it isn't.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:03 am
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    A VR Metroid game would be cool

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:03 am
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    It's funny that MP3 had a lot of design choices that were trying to be "more Halo" considering Halo Infinite is supposedly going to have quite a bit of Metroidvania influence in it (or at least that's what I've heard)

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:06 am
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    Hollow Knight?

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:10 am
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    hollow knight

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  • September 18, 2019 at 4:52 am
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    I'm really looking forward to see if they apply to Metroid what they did on Switch for Mario and Zelda, reimagining the formula to offer a refreshed but classic experience

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:03 am
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    Every time Nintendo tried to make Metroid turn into Halo or something else it sucked. Meanwhile all these other devs are making metroid inspired clones 🤷‍♂️

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:13 am
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    "They also used the added power of the Wii…" – things I'd never thought I'd hear.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:19 am
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    I almost missed the teaser at the end for the next one. EXCITED!!!!

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:21 am
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    Will you do a video on the DS game Metroid Prime: Hunters?

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:31 am
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    BUT WHAT ABOUT THE PINBALL

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:32 am
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    Holy crap a Hollow Knight episode! I have been hoping and waiting for this 😀

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:37 am
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    I don't think game devs cater to stupid people by making games easier, but that game devs are from a stupid generation that was thought to think mechanically

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:40 am
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    "Next time…let's just say it's gonna be a big one."
    Me: Tries imagining every game I know that might be big or have big things or a big scope. Skyrim? GTA? A Mario game with big mushrooms or big Bowser? Subspace Emissary? Smash Ultimate: World of Light? Some other open-world game?

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:43 am
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    Can you do Metroid Prime Hunters?

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:50 am
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    How dare you to call Metroid Prime 3 “weak”?? It’s an amazing game!!!

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:53 am
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    People, I just want to say one thing, I know mark isn't a god of the truth about game design, even he knows that for sure, but I feel like a lot of you that disagree with mark think this way because you really liked the game when you played it so it becomes hard to see issues with it (not all of you but some for sure). I'll just say that: first, mark before these videos actually plays the games again so he can do this in depth analysis so just think that maybe playing it today some of you would see what he's talking about (or maybe not), and second, he says it may be the weakest in the franchise and has quite a few issues, but doesn't say it's an awful game or anything like that, all games have issues and especially long running franchises, its fucking hard to make every entry better than the previous one. Basically, just think if you're not biased because of your childhood memories from the game being analyzed

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  • September 18, 2019 at 6:36 am
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    Reminded me of my recurring disappointment with RDR2 with the minimap turned off (and in first person).

    At least after the remarks of some sadly ignorant or misinformed people who got to check the game out early. (Disappointed more in R* than of them, though.)

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  • September 18, 2019 at 6:41 am
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    I cat find the metroid fusion video anymore 🙁

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  • September 18, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    >We play Metroid for exploration, solitude, and exploration, not shooty shooty bang bang.

    Nahhhhhh. If the combat in the Metroid games wasn't so fun (especially the boss battles), I wouldn't play it.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 7:02 am
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    Hello!
    I play Super Metroid 2 times a year, however I couldn't finish any of the Prime titles cause of the issues you mentioned in this series. I'm not so sure that Retro will just change the formula for Metroid Prime 4, maybe it will be a polished version of this Prime formula… which I do not like much :/ I hope Nintendo will release a new 2D Metroid game with the original key points that defined the series.
    Congratulations for this great series.

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  • September 18, 2019 at 7:32 am
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    It's strange to think how much was gained from the Wii's extra capabilities.

    On the face of it, people always joked about it being '2 gamecubes taped together'.
    But… Even if there is a grain of truth in that, this isn't without consequence.

    Being that both the CPU and GPU speed are basically doubled from a gamecube, it follows that the complexity of lots of things can be increased a lot more than you'd think too.

    For one thing, if you don't upgrade the graphical fidelity, it should be obvious you can have twice as many objects in a scene now.

    And of course, using actual DVD's basically means about a 6 fold increase in storage capacity, which is nothing to sneeze at, and certainly would go some way to explaining stuff like full voice acting and the like.

    The Wii is a pretty strange system in a lot of ways… But still it's more powerful than a gamecube, and that does have consequences…

    Reply

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